Aluminiumville

£14.99

Government, Global Business and the Scottish Highlands

An exploration of the Scottish Highlands and the aluminium industry. This book charts this neglected history of an industry that became inextricably tied to imperial interests and national defence, and its impact on the communities and landscape around its Highland works.

 

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In 1895 the fledgling British Aluminium Company started work on its first aluminium reduction works at Foyers on the banks of Loch Ness. By the outbreak of the First World War – a conflict that was to transform the perception of the metal and the industry – the company’s two Highland factories produced 12 per cent of the total global production of the metal. This book charts this neglected history of an industry that became inextricably tied to imperial interests and national defence, and its impacts on the communities and landscape around its Highland works. With a foreword by Rt Hon Charles Kennedy MP.

This heavy Highland industry is the subject of Dr Andrew Perchard’s book, a lecturer in business history and strategy at Strathclyde University. Dr Perchard stresses: “This is a story about the Highlands being at the centre of a global industry. On the eve of the First World War, Foyers and Kinlochleven accounted for 12% of the global production of aluminium. These Highland smelters were the backbone of the aluminium industry in the UK for the bulk of the 20th century.”
Herald Scotland (17/08/12)

‘A new book about how aluminium smelting has shaped life in the Highlands over the past century was launched in Fort William on Monday. Aluminiumville is by Dr Andrew Perchard, a lecturer in Business History and Strategy at the University of Strathclyde Business School and was formely a post-doctoral research fellow on the history of aluminium project at the Centre for History, University of the Highlands and Islands.’
Oban Times (30/08/2012)

‘Aluminiumville is a magnificent achievement. It covers a great deal of ground. It is packed with interesting ideas and insights, all resting on extraordinarily thorough research.’

‘The emergence of the aluminium industry in the Highlands has been put under the spotlight by a new book published this week. ‘Aluminiumville’, written by Dr Andrew Perchard – a former Research Fellow at UHI’s Centre for History – charts the emergence of the aluminium industry in the Scottish Highlands as part of the global trade in the metal.’
Ross-shire Journal (31/08/2012)

  • Author: Andrew Perchard
  • Binding: Paperback
  • ISBN: 9781905472154
  • Pages: 448
  • Date of Publication: May 2012
  • Dimensions: 234 x 156 mm

5 reviews for Aluminiumville

  1. Dr Kim Priemel (University of Cambridge and Humboldt Universität zu Berlin), Vierteljahrschrift für Sozial- und Wirtschaftsgeschichte (2013)

    A wonderful book… Doesn’t shrink back from making judgments… Infectious…A total history…
    Read the full review here: http://www.recensio.net/rezensionen/zeitschriften/vierteljahrschrift-fuer-sozial-und-wirtschaftsgeschichte/2013/3/ReviewMonograph956992858?set_language=en

  2. Professor Martin Chick (University of Edinburgh), Economic History Review (2014):

    BACo and its successor companies in Britain are well analysed by Perchard and shrewdly located in their political and environmental context. A valuable, well-researched book which is both very readable and well worth reading.
    Read full review here: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/1468-0289.12055_10/abstract

  3. Dr Lachlan MacKinnon (St Mary’s University), Business History (2018)

    The furious pace of expansion during the second industrial revolution enlivens the early pages of Andrew Perchard’s Aluminiumville. The book represents a careful scrutiny of the British Aluminium Company Ltd. (BACo) and its successors in the Scottish Highlands, with a keen focus on the economic, social and environmental factors that shaped its rise and fall…Compelling in its style and exhaustive in its source material, Aluminiumville is an excellent example of modern storytelling about the industrial era.
    Read the full review here: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00076791.2018.1446769?needAccess=true

  4. Dr Heather Holmes, Review of Scottish Culture 26 (2014)

    This book is a model for industrial and business history and will inspire others to examine and re-examine what good industrial and business history is.
    Read the full review here: https://www.academia.edu/33405435/Andrew_Perchard_Aluminiumville_Government_Global_Business_and_the_Scottish_Highlands_in_Review_of_Scottish_Culture_26_2014_166-168

  5. Dr Andrew Newby (University of Helsinki),

    This volume constitutes an important addition to business history and economic history, certainly, and opens up some new research avenues into environmental history, but more generally it is a very strong addition to Scottish and European social history… Perchard writes with great lucidity, and with the authority that comes from having a command of the sources and a wide overview of national and international historiographical themes. He also succeeds in painting a compelling picture of these communities.
    Read full review here: http://pure.au.dk/portal/en/persons/andrew-geoffrey-newby(ddefc1ae-2e0b-4574-9a92-78c660e00152)/publications/review-aluminiumville-government-global-business-and-the-scottish-highlands(4839f518-d5d1-4d7a-ab5c-7bc8442f0563).html

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